Warning: Declaration of Imbalance2_Walker_Nav_Menu::start_lvl(&$output, $depth) should be compatible with Walker_Nav_Menu::start_lvl(&$output, $depth = 0, $args = Array) in /home/fieldj5/public_html/wp-content/themes/imbalance2/functions.php on line 102

Warning: Declaration of Imbalance2_Walker_Nav_Menu::end_lvl(&$output, $depth) should be compatible with Walker_Nav_Menu::end_lvl(&$output, $depth = 0, $args = Array) in /home/fieldj5/public_html/wp-content/themes/imbalance2/functions.php on line 102
Introduction to Learning Art and Resistance from the South | FIELD

Introduction to Learning Art and Resistance from the South

Introduction to Learning Art and Resistance from the South

Eva Marxen

The title of the current special issue of FIELD: A Journal of Socially Engaged Art Criticism is taken from the eponymous “Reflection Cycle” organized in October and November 2018 at the Sullivan Galleries of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Learning Art and Resistance from the South was embedded in the show Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas. Curated by Bill Kelley Jr., the exhibition assembled a significant quantity and variety of contemporary, critical, and community-based art practices from different Latin American countries, as well as Latin/Latinx artists based in the United States. All of the artists chosen for this show have developed collaborative, participatory, relational, and socially engaged art projects. This Reflection Cycle focused on the extremely rich artistic heritage of Latin America, which has grown out of resistance to historical and contemporary social, economic, political, and environmental oppression. In South and Central America, artists have often been predecessors of practices that, later, are touted in North America and Europe as new and innovative, hardly receiving credit for their long contributions. In recognition of this history, this discussion series opened space for artists and researchers to discuss their practices on their own terms, and has created an opportunity for the SAIC community to learn from this dialogue. This issue is a continuation of this discussion, broadening the vision enunciated in those initial dialogues to address broader paradigms of resistances from the South.

André Mesquita, Talking to Action-A Diagram (2017)

Common Inquiries of the Show and the Cycle

The art projects presented in Talking to Action share a commitment to the ethos of transdisciplinarity, combining or “blurring the lines between object making, political and environmental activism, community organizing, and performance.” They deal with and question “issues, including migration and memory, critical mapping and cartographic practices, environmental issues and policies, gender rights and legislation, indigenous culture, racial violence, and policing tactics, and are often produced in collaboration with particular communities in rural or urban environments in politically charged contexts.”[1] In all, twenty three artists or artist collectives from all over the Americas contributed.[2] Additionally, Chicago’s version of Talking to Action included another exhibition, Safehouse, by SAIC alum Beatriz Santiago Muñoz.[3] Her show focused on colonialism, resistance, and sensorial unconsciousness, in relationship to the Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional (FALN), a clandestine, armed, anti-colonial group operating in Chicago and New York during the 1970s and 1980s, against colonialism in Puerto Rico. The show paralleled public conversations of the artist about the history of political prisoners in the U.S. (with Jan Susler); colonialism and the unconscious (with the Lacanian, Argentinean-born psychoanalyst Patricia Gherovici); and art, liberation, and the political subject (with Elizam Escobar, Puerto Rican art theorist, artist, and former FALN member).

Although here and in the catalog-book, the artists’ cities and countries are indicated, the nation state—particularly its borders, with repressive migration and other controls—has certainly been one of the objects of critique within the Talking to Action project. Some artists are challenging the border state by basing themselves in different geographical areas and by transnational practices, migration being the very essence of their work (i.e. Dignicraft); others have developed transnational collaborations focusing on common, nation-unbound issues, such as environmental, neoliberalist exploitation (Sandra de la Loza based in Los Angeles and Eduardo Molinari based in Buenos Aires); still others have expanded their work from their city of residence towards other territories (see Pedro Reyes and his project in North Lawndale, Chicago). Finally, the KRT’s (Kolectivo de Restauración Territorial) location reflects the centuries-long struggle of the Mapuche indigenous collective against the oppressive and imperialist nation state itself.

The flows of artistic and political practices back and forth across borders are especially evident in the show in the variety of artistic experiences based on migration between the U.S. and (in most cases) Mexico. This is evident in the works of Dignicraft, Cog•nate Collective, and Taniel Morales, and, at a broader Latin American scale, in the works of Ultra Red, or Liliana Angulo Cortés, who explores the connections between Black and Afro-Colombian movements along the Pacific coast, specifically Colombia and the U.S. These artistic practices reflect concepts of transnationalism and transculturalism that have been developed mainly in migration studies. In 1994, Basch, Glick Schiller & Szanton Blanc published the book Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Predicaments, and Deterritorialized Nation-States. The title itself contains most of the key terms of transnationalism. The authors “define ‘transnationalism’ as the process by which immigrants forge and sustain multi-stranded social relations that link together their societies of origin and settlement . . . many immigrants today build social fields that cross geographic, cultural, and political borders.”[4]

Whereas, the notion of the nation state and its boundaries used to be more static nowadays its frontiers and limits are constantly undermined, mainly due to migration and the globalization of international capital. Conjointly, migrants have built transnational spaces that link both their societies of origin and of settlement. Thus, they overcome the supposed dichotomy between place of origin and place of settlement while describing interconnected spaces in between. In these spaces, people, goods, affections, capital, services, information, images, and desires flow constantly; at the same time, the ideas and representations of origin and destination oscillate. These dynamics occur thanks to the present technological context, which allows immediate and simultaneous access to different mass media and facilitates new possibilities of movement and mobility.[5] In short, these transnational realities have impacts on artistic practice and vice versa.

The title Talking to Action points to the discursive and dialogical feature of the show and its artists, and also to the active elements of their artistic practices, many of which lead to or invited political action.[6] Because of the nature of these practices, and the preponderance of them in this show, the definition of terms like “political” or “critical” art seems necessary. In accordance with political scientist Chantal Mouffe [7], the term “critical art” is given preference over “political art,” because the latter is considered redundant and inevitably leads to an incorrect topology. All art embraces a political dimension, since it reflects a given symbolical order. At the same time, politics always embraces an aesthetic dimension in the symbolic order of social relationships. The arts never exist in a cultural vacuum. They are always interconnected with the structures of a society, which they can either reify or challenge.[8] The Talking to Action artists have all, in one form of another, opposed society’s mechanisms of control and oppression, defying hegemonic societal discourses in Gramsci’s sense, facilitating spaces for resistance, alternatives, and eventually, the potential for change. Mouffe[9], Ana Longoni [10] (who discusses a “politicity” in the arts [Sp. “politicidad”]), and Eva Marxen [11] have all identified different forms and possibilities in critical art practice, with “activist art” being the most obvious, but not the only way, of using art to oppose oppression.

Another crucial aspect of Talking to Action has been its collaborative dimension, from the inception of research for the exhibition, through the publication of the catalog-book, [12] and including the accompanying events at all of the show’s venues: Otis College of Art in Los Angeles, School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Arizona State University in Tempe, and Pratt Institute in New York. As Kelley explained: “From the beginning, we hoped that a traveling exhibition would not be a set of touring objects, but a platform for other institutions to engage and explore related inquiries into the relationship and problematics Talking to Action addresses.”[13] One of the main motivations for the Reflection Cycle was precisely the organization of a platform for further exploration and discursive exchange. It was conceived as a space for collective reflection, close—but not exclusively bound—to the issues confronted by the Talking to Action show.

The other reason for the Reflection Cycle was to offer an alternate epistemological mapping of community-based art. In the curator’s words: “Given the quick growth and academicization of the field that we call social practice in the United States over the last decade, I was determined to say something about the intellectual and methodological roots of these practices that were not simply anchored in northern-transatlantic thinking.” In alignment with the show, the Reflection Cycle wished “to redirect the legacies of the past.”[14] In particular, it focused on South and Central American artists who are frequently denied credit for artistic and philosophical advances that are rooted in their long-term opposition to different forms of oppression. Some earlier examples would be the dematerialization of the visual arts, or relational aesthetics. In the case of relational aesthetics, Bourriaud [15] claimed to have introduced this concept in Paris, although artists like Lygia Clark had already worked much more intensely to establish relational spaces of subjectivity more than twenty years earlier in Brazil.[16] Regarding the dematerialization of the arts, in Argentina, Oscar Masotta [17] wrote about it in the same year as Lucy Lippard, but the latter was declared to have been the originator of the term.[18] More details on this question can be found in my article in the current issue of FIELD about epistemological imperialism, based on thinkers like Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui and Boaventura de Sousa Santos.

In this context, and in relation to the Talking to Action catalogue, the importance of the book coedited by Kelley and Kester [19] must be stressed. It joins texts by many of the primary Latin American artists and thinkers in English translation, making them accessible for a non-Spanish-speaking public. In recognition of this history of cultural, artistic, and philosophical appropriation, the Reflection Cycle intentionally opened space for artists and researchers to discuss their practices and created an opportunity for the SAIC community to learn from their examples. In Kelley’s own words: “. . . it only made sense to begin with the idea that we’re attempting to learn something and that this learning should take the form of a dialogue.”[20] Hence, the dialogue form of the Reflection Cycle and its title, Learning Art and Resistance from the South.

“Art and Resistance” gives long overdue justice to the extreme richness of Latin American art practices that have taken the form of resistance against social, economic, and political oppression. Recently, also, many creative practices have been emerged that successfully oppose environmental pillage and exploitation. Many artists, art activists, and groups have developed and carried out extremely sophisticated artworks—and artistic interventions—based on rigorous critical thinking, guided by principles of collectivity, leading to a high symbolic efficacy. Thus, they have been able to successfully oppose political oppression and hegemonic discourses (in the sense described by Mouffe, above). In summary, the Reflection Cycle’s objective was to create a space for dialogue, exchange, and the co-construction of meaning. It offered a platform for critical thinking and reading related to Latin American contemporary arts and philosophy as forms of resistance, a critique of epistemological imperialism and capitalist subjectification, and an exchange of art and political experiences between both North and South America and the English- and Spanish-speaking worlds. Finally, the Reflection Cycle increased inclusion of Hispanic language and culture into the School and the city of Chicago, using Hispanic art practices as models for learning.

The Reflection Cycle Events

Learning Art and Resistance from the South was designed for students, faculty, and staff of SAIC, as well as any other interested parties in Chicago. Events, including lunch, were open to the public at no cost. Every session consisted of a dialogue between a Chicago-based artist or scholar and artists (or artist collectives) from the show, joining by Skype. After discussion among the artists, the conversation was opened to the public for questions and comments. In the beginning of each session, a reference list was distributed, suggesting relevant literature and digital resources in Spanish and English, including recommendations of the dialogue partners. The Chicago-based participants were chosen by me (Eva Marxen), and they in turn selected the specific artists from the show with whom to engage in dialogue. I knew Brian Holmes’ work, as we had simultaneously collaborated with the MACBA museum in Barcelona from 2000-2013, during a period of significant institutional innovation.[21] I met Ionit Behar when touring the Hélio Oiticica show at SAIC with my students in 2017. Finally, Josh Rios and I conceived of and carried out the SAIC study trip “Social and Contemporary Art Practices in Chile” in 2018.

Iconoclasistas, Mapamundi ¿A quién pertenece la tierra? Who owns the land? (2015-17)

The first event took place with Brian Holmes and Iconoclasistas, an artist duo based in Buenos Aires, formed in 2006 by Pablo Ares  and Julia Risler. Their work consists of critical collaborative mapping and strategies of critical cartography. They organize free, graphic dispositifs for collective, collaborative, participatory research. Their materials and methodologies are also disseminated for free on the internet through Creative Commons licensing, such as the Manual of Collective Mapping: Critical Cartographic Resources for Territorial Collaborative-Creation Processes.[22] In workshops with these two artists, participants are encouraged to take a bird’s-eye view of the territory and conflict to be mapped. They aim at a change of consciousness, a simultaneous transformation of the self and the territory, as well as bi-directional feedback between artists and participants. Instead of making an artwork and sharing it afterwards with the public, Iconoclasistas share a space and a methodology in order to develop an artwork with others.

Their work very often protests against the pillage, plundering, and exploitation of the environment, which leads to the degradation of entire communities. This is manifest in the artworks exhibited in the Talking to Action show. X-Ray of the Heart of the Soy Wheel (2010) opposes the massive expansion of transgenic soy and pesticides, and Mega-Mining in the Dry Andes (2010), focuses on the destruction of the Andean ecosystem, with deleterious consequences for the rights and health of entire communities. To accomplish their artistic purpose, Iconoclasistas work with the concept of a “rebellious cosmovision”. Cosmovision—a critical view and mapping of extractivism and environmental exploitation—are exactly the points shared by Brian Holmes. He is an activist, cultural critic, social theorist, and cartographer living in Chicago after a couple of decades in France. Brian is widely known for his essays on art, social movements, and political economy. A frequent visitor to Latin America, he has written about various Argentinean art groups and is currently working with Alejandro Meitin of Ala Plástica. Over the last few years, he has shifted into the role of artist, creating online maps and museum installations about political ecology.[23]

The second session took place between Chicago-based art historian, curator, and writer Ionit Behar and Dignicraft. Dignicraft is a hybrid art collective, media production company, and cultural mediator, inspired by the struggle for human dignity and justice, the artisanal process of creation, and the potential of collaboration to spark change. The group accomplishes their ends by producing documentaries, distributing cultural goods (such as films), and facilitating collaborative workshops as part of a contemporary art project. The most important issues for Dignicraft are the quality of the relationships they establish in their projects, and their consequences. They describe their practice as revolving around “’encuentros’ [encounters], where dialogue and respect are vital, as is the possibility of communicating through actions or practical activities.”[24] Dignicraft has been active since 2013, mainly in Tijuana, Mexico, and also transnationally in California, USA. The group evolved from the collective work started in 2000 under the name Bulbo, and Galatea audio/visual. Currently, Dignicraft includes Paola Rodríguez, José Luis Figueroa, Omar Foglio, Blanca O. España†, David Figueroa, and Araceli Blancarte. Located at the border in Tijuana, Dignicraft operates amidst the transnational and transcultural flow of people, goods, news, drugs, arts, crafts, etc. As they explained in the session, this position there has led to a permanent shift in perspective. In Talking to Action they showed their collaborative project, La Piñata Colaborativa (2015-2017). “Indigenous Purepecha artisans focused on migration and memory. In workshops with Dignicraft, the Purepecha families each mapped their relocation from Michoacán to Rosarito, Baja California. They used their personal journeys to inspire the production of piñatas that spoke of their migratory experience and worked to negotiate a more equitable trade relationship with vendors in Los Angeles.”[25] Ionit Behar’s interests have focused on twentieth century Latin American and North American art, art under censorship, socially engaged art practice, the history of exhibitions, and theories of space and place. She is also the Director of Curatorial Affairs for Fieldwork Collaborative Projects NFP (FIELDWORK) in Chicago.

The second session included dialogue about the mediation work of Dignicraft and included excerpts of their film Tijuaneados Anonimos (2009), a project that gathered people from Tijuana on a weekly basis to discuss and reflect about their city, during a time when extensive violence had threatened to fracture the city’s social body. Participants thought about the town and themselves, and how to change both. The project is a form of resistance against violence, but also against hiding oneself and self-censorship. Removing oneself from public life, withdrawing into one’s home, fuels anxiety and terror: “There it feeds nightmares crippling the capacity for public protest and spirited intelligent opposition”.[26] The objective of Tijuaneados Anonimos was to reverse this fragmentation. The artists and involved communities sought to “create a new public ritual whose aim is to allow the tremendous moral and magical power of the unquiet dead to flow into the public sphere, empower individuals, and challenge the would-be guardians of the Nation-State, guardians of its dead, as well as its living, of its meaning and of its destiny.”[27]

The third session was a trialogue between Josh Rios (SAIC), Sandra de la Loza from Los Angeles, and Eduardo Molinari from Buenos Aires. Sandra de la Loza creates open-ended, research-based platforms that guide inquiries encompassing visual, experimental, social, and pedagogical components. In 2002, she founded the Pocho Research Society of Erased and Invisible History, an ongoing collaborative project that engages the subject of “History” (with a capital H) through critical inquiry and artistic processes. She explores History as an elastic space of practice, one that can be shaped, stretched and expanded, while exposing the processes by which dominant narratives are created. Eduardo Molinari is a visual artist and research professor in the Visual Arts Department of the Universidad Nacional de las Artes (UNA), Buenos Aires. At the core of his work are walking as an aesthetic practice, research with art-based tools, and multidisciplinary collaborations. In 2001, he created the Archivo Caminante [Walking Archive], a visual archive in progress that delves into the relationships between art and history, and develops critiques of dominant historical narratives, actions against the mummification of social memory, and exercises in collective political imagination.[28] The contributions of Molinari and de la Loza to Talking to Action marked their first collaboration. Following up on the common features of both their works—developing “counter-hegemonic narratives”[29] through dialogical and archivistic practices—they engaged in transnational research about the production of space, extractivist economies, displacement, and both eclipsed and living indigenous knowledge. These studies resulted in their installation/archive Donde se juntan los ríos: hidromancia archivista y otros fantasmas [Where rivers meet: archivistic hidromancy and other phantasms]. It includes different visual, archival, sound, and textual elements, including a dialogue held in the form of “cartas caminantes [itinerant letters].”

Josh Rios is a faculty member at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where he teaches courses in visual critical studies and research-based practice. As a media artist, writer, and educator, his projects deal with the histories, archives, and futurities of Latinx subjectivity and US/Mexico relations, as understood through globalization and neocoloniality. In his session with Sandra and Eduardo they discussed questions of history and memory, and how to create history today by bringing it into the arts. They also elaborated on their transnational collaboration in critical cartography. According to the artists, the goal of their collaboration was not to reach conclusions but to raise questions about common concerns in their respective research projects. This inquiry takes shape of a visual investigation. Their collaboration also included an institutional critique of official education, related to their shared desire to create their own, counter-pedagogical spaces that should teach disobedience and insubordination, as well as the political imagination, necessary for resistance. Finally, they debated neo-extractivism as well as neocolonialism and anthropocentrism. Indigenous knowledge has comprehended the importance of a dialogue, and co-existence with nature and non-humans, for hundreds of thousands of years, but dominant History has tried to erase this knowledge. Here, there are obvious parallels to the first session with Holmes and Iconoclasistas in their research on cosmovision, ecotopia, and artistic forms of resistance against environmental oppression.

The Vision

An important motivation for this special issue of FIELD was to turn the conversations of the Talking to Action Reflection Cycle into a publication. Yet, I wish to stress that none of the contributions published here are mere transcriptions of the recordings, but rather, new elaborations in written form. These articles provide space to reflect on collaboration, with texts that have been written in response to artistic alliances on subjects such as embodied memory, counter-narratives, and new political imaginings through para-archivism (Rios, Molinari & de la Loza). Alternatively, Iconoclasistas develop dispositifs to think the common in the form of a collective, critical mapping that opposes hegemony. Behar & Dignicraft reflect on encounters and collaborations as part of an artistic practice that is based on participation, dialogue, and mutual learning. The written accounts of the three Reflection Cycle sessions are each preceded by articles about curatorial processes (Barco & Caso), including challenges in defining and building community in and through curatorship (Kelley). Varas and Gutiérrez, who collaborated as researchers on the Talking to Action show since its very beginning, reflect here on research, care, and resistance in the context of (neo) colonial violence. Marxen elaborates on North-Atlantic epistemological imperialism in relation to the arts. Beyond the Cycle and the show, the Network Conceptualism South [Red Conceptualismos del Sur or RedCSur] calls for a common archival policy for arts and politics in contemporary condition of reactionary governments, historical denial and severe restrictions on public and human rights. During the preparation of this issue of FIELD there have been important outbreaks of public resistance in South America, as people have protested actively and creatively against neoliberal, right wing and repressive politics. Three contributions give justice of the on-going, continuous and rigorous resistance being carried out in Chile: Paulina Varas relates subjectivities and art with a new political becoming. Guillermo Rivera and Luis Jiménez reflect on youth and their resistance against unemployment, precarization, and neoliberalism. And Mirliana Ramírez deepens our understanding of citizenship and political participation in academia as well as the role of the academic in society.

Eva Marxen, Streets of Valparaíso, Chile (November 2019)

Eva Marxen, Streets of Valparaíso, Chile (November 2019)

Learning and collaboration are leitmotifs throughout the issue. They have been evident in the curatorial process and related research, the art practices under discussion, and the writing process for this issue. “There must be a respect for the process of collaboration and dialogue as the art form. In other words, to paraphrase Freire, these objects are not the conclusion of a dialogical praxis; they are often simply mediators of ongoing dialogues.”[30] In this sense, we wish to contribute to an ongoing discussion opposing “conventional notions of aesthetic autonomy,” and instead, to continue to expand the epistemology of collaborative practices. The collaboration process also carries “hermeneutic implications,” as it is essential for the comprehension of the artwork itself.[31] Engaging with this open process of inquiry and imagination, in images and/or words, should be considered a form of resistance against the dominant subjectivation of neoliberalism and its illusion of giving rapid and easy answers.[32]

Eva Marxen is an anthropologist (PhD and DEA), art therapist (MA), and psychoanalytical psychotherapist (MA). Currently, she works as an assistant Professor, School of the Art Institute of Chicago. For a decade, Marxen worked with the MACBA (Museum of Contemporary Art) and at the art school La Massana (UAB), both in Barcelona, Catalonia/Spain. She has published numerous articles in both books and journals in different languages and has held conferences as well as workshops at a national and international level. Moreover, she has guest lectured at the art faculties of the University of Chile and the University Finis Terrae (Santiago de Chile), the Universities of Genoa (Italy), Toulouse (France), Veracruz, the Autonomous Metropolitan University (UAM) Xochimilco (both in Mexico), the National University of Córdoba and the Center of Psychotherapy Studies (CEP, both in Argentina) as well as the Institute of Music, Art and Process (IMAP, Basque Country/Spain). Additionally, she has been an invited researcher at the University of the Philippines Diliman, Manila. In 2011, Marxen published the book Dialogues between Art and Therapy: From “Psychotic Art” to the Development of Art Therapy and its Applications (Gedisa, Barcelona). Her next book Deinstitutionalizing Art of the Nomadic Museum will be published in 2020 by Routledge New York.

Acknowledgements

I am grateful to all the participating artists, collectives, writers, copy-editors and translators of Learning Art and Resistance from the South. Thanks to all of your texts, images, translations, and (on-line) conversations the editing process has been incredibly awarding and enriching. I hope that this issue opens up spaces for future discussion with all.

Particularly, I would like to thank curator Bill Kelley Jr. who had supported this publication from its very beginning.

At the same time, my gratitude goes to SAIC’s Sullivan Galleries, precisely to Trevor Martin and Hannah Barco for their support of both the organization of the eponymous Reflection Cycle and this publication.

I would also like to extend special thanks to Grant Kester and the editorial collective of FIELD for their great support, encouragement, and flexibility as we completed this issue.

Notes

[1] “Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas,” School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), accessed February 12, 2020, https://sites.saic.edu/talkingtoaction/.

[2] The featured artists in the SAIC show, Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas, were:

  • Ultra-red and The School of Echoes Los Angeles (Los Angeles, U.S.)
  • BijaRi (São Paulo, Brazil)
  • Cog•nate Collective (Tijuana, Mexico/Los Angeles, U.S.)
  • Grupo Contrafilé (São Paulo, Brazil)
  • Liliana Angulo Cortés (Bogotá, Colombia)
  • Dignicraft (Tijuana, Mexico/Los Angeles, U.S.)
  • Andrés Padilla Domene + Iván Puig Domene (Guadalajara/San Miguel de Allende, both Mexico)
  • Etcétera… (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  • Frente 3 de Fevereiro (São Paulo, Brazil)
  • Colectivo FUGA (Otavalo, Ecuador)
  • Clara Ianni (São Paulo, Brazil)
  • Iconoclasistas (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  • Suzanne Lacy (Los Angeles, U.S.)
  • Alfadir Luna (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • Sandra de la Loza (Los Angeles, U.S.) and Eduardo Molinari (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  • Taniel Morales (Mexico City, Mexico)
  • POLEN (Tijuana, Mexico/San Diego, U.S.)
  • Gala Porras-Kim (Los Angeles, U.S.)
  • KRT (Kolectivo de Restauración Territorial, Mapuche territory, southern Chile).
  • SAIC faculty Maria Gaspar and the Radioactive Ensemble
  • Pedro Reyes (Mexico City) and his artwork related to the SAIC space at North Lawndale.

For more of the artists’ information, see https://sites.saic.edu/talkingtoaction/artists/, accessed February 20, 2020, and the exhibition catalogue edited by Kelley and Zamora, 2017.

[3] “Affiliated Exhibition: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz: Safehouse,” School of the Art Institute of Chicago, accessed February 20, 2020, https://sites.saic.edu/talkingtoaction/affiliated-exhibition.

[4] Linda Basch, Nina Glick Schiller, and Cristina Szanton Blanc, Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Predicaments, and Deterritorialized Nation-States (New York: Gordon and Breach, 1994), p.7.

[5] Arjun Appadurai, Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimension of Globalization (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996); George Marcus, Ethnography Through Thick and Thin (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998); Eva Marxen, “‘La comunidad silenciosa’. Migraciones Filipinas y capital social en el Raval (Barcelona),” Ph.D. dissertation, University Rovira i Virgili, 2012. http://www.tdx.cat/bitstream/handle/10803/96667/ TESIS.pdf?sequence=1.

[6] Bill Kelley Jr., “Acknowledgements,” in Talking to Action. Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas, edited by Bill Kelley Jr. with Rebecca Zamora (Los Angeles: Otis College and Chicago: School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2017), pp.v-vi.; Karen Moss, “Talking to Action: An Introduction to the Project and its Platforms,” in Talking to Action. Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas, ed. Bill Kelley Jr. with Rebecca Zamora (Los Angeles: Otis College and Chicago: School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2017), pp.1-6.

[7] Chantal Mouffe, Prácticas artísticas y democracia agonística, translated by Jordi Palou and Carlos Manzano (Barcelona: MACBA and Bellaterra: UAB, 2007); Chantal Mouffe, “Alfredo Jaar: The Artist as Organic Intellectual,” in Alfredo Jaar. The Way it is. An Aesthetics of Resistance, edited by RealismusStudio (Berlin: RealismusStudio of NGBK, New Society for Visual Arts, 2012), pp.263-281.

[8] Eva Marxen, “Deshaciendo fronteras: el arte como denuncia,” in No nos cabe tanta muerte, exhibition catalogue, edited by Paula Laverde (Barcelona/Granollers: Roca Umbert, 2013); Eva Marxen, “La expresión veraz de los saberes corporeizados,” in Más allá del texto. Cultura digital y nuevas epistemologías, edited by Ileana A. Hernández, Luisa F. Grijalva Maza, and Alfonso A. R. Gómez Rossi (Mexico City: Editorial Itaca, 2016), pp.67-78; Eva Marxen, “Art Therapy,” In Critical Perspectives in Arts Therapies: Response/Ability across a Continuum of Practice, co-authored by Sajnani, Nisha, Eva Marxen, and Rebecca Zarate, The Arts in Psychotherapy 54, pp.28–37. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2017.01.007.; Eva Marxen, “Artistic Practices and the Artistic Dispositif. A Critical Review,” Antípoda. Journal of Anthropology and Archeology 33 (2018), pp.37-60.

[9] Chantal Mouffe, Prácticas artísticas y democracia agonística; Mouffe, Alfredo Jaar, pp.263-281.

[10] Ana Longoni, “Experimentos en las inmediaciones del arte y la política,” in Roberto Jacoby. El deseo nace del derrumbe. Acciones, conceptos, escritos, edited by Roberto Jacoby (Barcelona: La Central, 2011), pp.5-29.

[11] Eva Marxen, Deshaciendo fronteras; Marxen, La expresión veraz de los saberes corporeizados, pp.67-78; Marxen, Artistic practices and the artistic dispositif, pp. 37-60.

[12] Bill Kelley Jr. with Rebecca Zamora, Talking to Action.

[13] Bill Kelley Jr., Acknowledgements, Talking to Action, p.v.

[14] Bill Kelley Jr., “Talking to Action: A Curatorial Experiment Towards Dialogue and Learning,” p.7.

[15] Nicolas Bourriaud, Esthétique relationnelle (Dijon: Les presses du réel, 1998).

[16] Lygia Clark, edited by Manuel Borja and Nuria Enguita (Barcelona: Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 1998), exhibition catalogue; Lygia Clark. The Abandonment of Art, 1948-1988, edited by Cornelia Butler and Luis Pérez-Oramas (New York: The Museum of Modern Art), exhibition catalogue; Eva Marxen, “Therapeutic Thinking in Contemporary Art. Psychotherapy in the Arts,” The Arts in Psychotherapy 36, pp.131-139. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2008.10.004.; Suely Rolnik, Lygia Clark. De l’œuvre à l’événement – Nous sommes le moule. A vous de donner le soufflé (Nantes: Musée des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, 2005), exhibition catalog.

[17] Ana Longoni and Mariano Mestman, “After Pop, We Dematerialize: Oscar Masotta, Happenings, and Media Art at the Beginnings of Conceptualism,” in Listen Here Now! Argentine Art of the 1960s: Writings of the Avant-Garde, edited by Ines Katzenstein (New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2004), pp.156-172; Oscar Masotta, “Después del pop: nosotros desmaterializamos,” in Conciencia y estructura, edited by Oscar Masotta (Buenos Aires: Editorial Jorge Álvarez, 1968), pp.218-245.

[18] Lucy Lippard and John Chandler, “The Dematerialization of Art,” Art International 12, no. 2 (1968), pp.31-36.

[19] Bill Kelley Jr. and Grant Kester, Collective Situations. Readings in Contemporary Latin American Art, 1995-2010 (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2017).

[20] Bill Kelley Jr., “Talking to Action: A Curatorial Experiment Towards Dialogue and Learning,” pp.7-8.

[21] Eva Marxen, La comunidad silenciosa; Marxen, La expresión veraz de los saberes corporeizados, 67-78; Marxen, Artistic Practices and the Artistic Dispositif, pp.37-60; Jorge Ribalta, “Experiments in a New Institutionality,” in Relational Objects. MACBA Collection 2002-2007, edited by Manuel Borja, Kaira Cabañas and Jorge Ribalta (Barcelona: MACBA, 2010), p. 225-265.

[22] Iconoclasistas, Manual of Collective Mapping: Critical Cartographic Resources for Territorial Collaborative-Creation Processes. (Buenos Aires: Iconoclasistas, 2013/2016).

[23] For some of his recent investigations, see the website, accessed February 20, 2020, www.ecotopia.today.

[24] Bill Kelley Jr. and Rebecca Zamora, Talking to Action, p.115.

[25] Karen Moss, Talking to Action: An Introduction to the Project and its Platforms, p.3.

[26] Michael Taussig, “Violence and Resistance in the Americas: The Legacy of Conquest,” in The Nervous System, edited by Michael Taussig (London and New York: Routledge, 1992), p.48.

[27] Taussig, Violence and Resistance in the Americas, pp.48-49.

[28] Nuria Enguita and Eduardo Molinari, “A Conversation between Eduardo Molinari and Nuria Enguita Mayo,” Afterall 30 (Summer 2012), pp. 61-75.

[29] Jennifer Ponce de León, “The Battleground of the Present: The Pocho Research Society, Archivo Caminante, and Etcétera,” in Talking to Action. Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas, edited by Bill Kelley Jr., p. 58.

[30] Bill Kelley Jr., “Talking to Action: A Curatorial Experiment Towards Dialogue and Learning,” p.12.

[31] Grant Kester, The One and the Many. Contemporary Collaborative Art in a Global Context. (Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2011), pp.9-10.

[32] Eva Marxen, Art Therapy, pp.28-36.

Spanish Version

Introducción Aprender Arte y Resistencia del Sur

Por Eva Marxen

Traducción inglés – español: Luisa Ospina (MAAT, SAIC) y Gloria Henao

El título de la edición especial actual de FIELD: A Journal of Socially Engaged Art Criticism (Una Revista  de la Crítica de Arte Socialmente Comprometida) es tomado del epónimo “Ciclo de Reflexión” organizado en octubre y noviembre de 2018 en las Galerías Sullivan de la Escuela del Instituto de Artes de Chicago. Aprender Arte y Resistencia del Sur fue incorporado en la exhibición Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas (Hablar y Actuar: Arte, Pedagogía y Activismo en las Américas). Curada por Bill Kelley Jr., la exhibición recopiló una importante cantidad y variedad de prácticas de arte contemporáneas, críticas y basadas en la comunidad de diferentes países latinoamericanos, así como artistas latinos/latinx radicados en los Estados Unidos. Todos los artistas elegidos para esta exhibición, han desarrollado proyectos de arte colaborativo, participativo, relacional y comprometidos socialmente. Este Ciclo de Reflexión se enfocó en la herencia artística extremadamente rica de Latinoamérica, que ha surgido de la resistencia a la opresión histórica y contemporánea, social, económica, política y ambiental. En Suramérica y Centroamérica, los artistas con frecuencia han sido predecesores de prácticas que, más tarde, son promocionadas en Norteamérica y Europa como nuevas e innovadoras, sin recibir crédito por sus extensas contribuciones. Como reconocimiento a esta historia, esta serie de discusiones abrió un espacio para que artistas e investigadores hablaran sobre sus prácticas en sus propios términos, y ha generado una oportunidad para que la comunidad de la SAIC aprenda de este diálogo. Esta edición es una continuación de esta discusión, ampliando la visión enunciada en esos diálogos iniciales para abordar paradigmas más amplios de resistencias del Sur.

Indagaciones Comunes de la Exhibición y del Ciclo

Los proyectos de arte presentados en Talking to Action, comparten un compromiso con el ethos de la transdisciplinariedad, combinando o “desdibujando las líneas entre la creación de objetos, el activismo político y ambiental, la organización de comunidades y el performance”. Lidian con, y cuestionan “problemas, incluyendo la migración y la memoria, prácticas críticas de mapeo y cartográficas, asuntos y políticas ambientales, derechos y legislación de género, cultura indígena, violencia racial y tácticas policiales, y con frecuencia son producidas en colaboración con comunidades particulares en ambientes rurales o urbanos en contextos cargados políticamente.”[1] En total, contribuyeron veintitrés artistas o colectivos de artistas de todas las Américas.[2] Además, la versión de Chicago de Hablar y Actuar incluyó otra exhibición, Safehouse (Casa de Seguridad), por la exalumna de SAIC Beatriz Santiago Muñoz [3]. Su exhibición se enfocó en el colonialismo, la resistencia y la inconsciencia sensorial, en relación con las Fuerzas Armadas de Liberación Nacional (FALN), un grupo armado clandestino, anticolonial que operó en Chicago y en Nueva York durante las décadas de 1970 y 1980 en contra del colonialismo en Puerto Rico. La exhibición integró conversaciones públicas de la artista acerca de la historia de prisioneros políticos en los EEUU (con Jan Susler); colonialismo y el inconsciente (con la psicoanalista lacaniana nacida en Argentina Patricia Gherovici); y arte, liberación y el tema político (con Elizam Escobar, Puertorriqueño teórico del arte, artista y antiguo miembro de las FALN).

Aunque aquí y en el catálogo se indican las ciudades y países de los artistas, el estado nacional—particularmente sus fronteras, con migración represiva y otros controles—ciertamente ha sido uno de los objetos de crítica dentro del proyecto Talking to Action. Algunos artistas están cuestionando el estado fronterizo radicándose en diferentes áreas geográficas, y por medio de prácticas transnacionales, siendo la migración la esencia misma de su trabajo (por ejemplo, Dignicraft); otros han desarrollado colaboraciones transnacionales enfocándose en asuntos comunes, sin asociación a naciones, tales como la explotación ambiental neoliberalista (Sandra de la Loza, radicada en Los Ángeles y Eduardo Molinari, radicado en Buenos Aires); aun así, otros han expandido su trabajo desde su ciudad de residencia hacia otros territorios (ver Pedro Reyes y su proyecto en North Lawndale, Chicago). Finalmente, la ubicación del KRT (Kolectivo de Restauración Territorial) refleja la lucha de varios siglos del colectivo indígena Mapuche contra el mismo estado nación opresivo e imperialista.

El flujo de prácticas artísticas y políticas entre fronteras es especialmente evidente en la exhibición, en la variedad de experiencias artísticas basadas en la migración entre los EEUU y (en la mayoría de los casos) México. Esto es evidente en el trabajo de Dignicraft, Cog•nate Collective, y Taniel Morales, y, a un nivel latinoamericano más amplio, en el trabajo de Ultra Red o Liliana Angulo Cortés, quien explora las conexiones entre los movimientos negros y afrocolombianos a lo largo de la costa pacífica, especialmente en Colombia y los EEUU.

Estas prácticas artísticas reflejan conceptos de transnacionalismo y transculturalismo que han sido desarrollados principalmente en estudios sobre migración. En 1994, Basch, Glick Schiller y Szanton Blanc publicaron el libro Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Predicaments, and Deterritorialized Nation-States (Naciones sin Límites: Proyectos Transnacionales, Problemáticas Postcoloniales y Estados Nacionales Desterritorializados). El título en sí ya contiene muchos de los términos clave del transnacionalismo. Las autoras “definen el ‘transnacionalismo’ como el proceso mediante el cual los inmigrantes forjan y mantienen relaciones sociales multilineales que enlazan a sus sociedades de origen y de asentamiento… muchos inmigrantes hoy en día construyen campos sociales que cruzan fronteras geográficas, culturales y políticas.”[4]

Mientras que la noción del estado nación y sus fronteras solía ser más estática, hoy en día sus fronteras y límites se ven socavados constantemente debido principalmente a la migración y a la globalización de capital internacional. En conjunto, los migrantes han generado espacios transnacionales que enlazan sus sociedades de origen y de asentamiento. Por lo tanto, debilitan la supuesta dicotomía entre lugar de origen y lugar de asentamiento mientras describen los espacios interconectados entre ellos. En estos espacios, las personas, los bienes, los afectos, el capital, los servicios, la información, las imágenes y los deseos fluyen constantemente; al mismo tiempo, oscilan las ideas y representaciones de origen y destino. Estas dinámicas ocurren gracias al presente contexto tecnológico, que permite acceso inmediato y simultáneo a diferentes medios masivos, y facilita nuevas posibilidades de movimiento y movilidad.[5] En síntesis, estas realidades transnacionales tienen impacto sobre la práctica artística y viceversa.

El título Hablar y Actuar apunta a la característica discursiva y dialogística de la exhibición y sus artistas, y también a los elementos activos de sus prácticas artísticas, muchas de las cuales generaron o invitaron a la acción política.[6] Debido a la naturaleza de estas prácticas, y a la preponderancia de las mismas en esta exhibición, la definición de términos como arte “político” o “crítico” parecen necesarias. De acuerdo con la politóloga Chantal Mouffe [7], el término “arte crítico” tiene preferencia por encima de “arte político”, debido a que esta última se considera redundante, y lleva inevitablemente a una topología incorrecta. Todo el arte acoge una dimensión política, ya que refleja un orden simbólico determinado. Al mismo tiempo, la política siempre acoge una dimensión estética en el orden simbólico de las relaciones sociales. Las artes nunca existen en un vacío cultural. Siempre están interconectadas con las estructuras de una sociedad, a la que pueden reificar o desafiar.[8] Todos los artistas de Talking to Action, de una u otra manera, se han opuesto a los mecanismos de control y opresión de la sociedad, desafiando los discursos sociales hegemónicos en el sentido de Gramsci, facilitando espacios para la resistencia, alternativas, y eventualmente el potencial para el cambio. Mouffe [9], Ana Longoni [10] (quien discute una “politicidad” en las artes), y Eva Marxen [11] han identificado diferentes formas y posibilidades en la práctica del arte crítico, siendo el “arte activista” la más obvia, pero no la única manera de usar el arte para oponerse a la opresión.

Otro aspecto crucial de Talking to Action ha sido su dimensión colaborativa, desde el principio de investigación para la exhibición, a través de la publicación del catálogo,[12] e incluyendo los eventos que han acompañado en todos los recintos de la exhibición: la Escuela de Artes Otis en Los Ángeles, la Escuela del Instituto de Artes de Chicago, la Universidad Estatal de Arizona en Tempe, y el Instituto Pratts en Nueva York. Como explicó Kelley: “Desde el principio, teníamos la esperanza de que la exposición itinerante no fuera una colección de objetos en gira, sino una plataforma para que otras instituciones se involucraran y exploraran indagaciones asociadas en torno a las relaciones y problemáticas que aborda Hablar y Actuar.”[13] Una de las principales motivaciones para el Ciclo de Reflexión fue precisamente la organización de una plataforma para una exploración más a fondo y un intercambio de discursos. Fue concebido como un espacio para la reflexión colectiva, cerca de—pero no limitado exclusivamente a—los asuntos confrontados por la exhibición Talking to Action.

El otro motivo para el Ciclo de Reflexión fue ofrecer un mapeo epistemológico alternativo del arte basado en la comunidad. En palabras del curador: “Dado el rápido crecimiento y academización durante la última década del campo que denominamos ‘social practice’ [práctica social] en los Estados Unidos de América quise expresarme sobre los orígenes  intelectuales  y metodológicos  de estas prácticas que no están simplemente arraigadas en el pensamiento transatlántico del norte.” En consonancia con la exhibición, el Ciclo de Reflexión deseaba “reorientar los legados del pasado.”[14] En particular, se enfocó en artistas de Suramérica y Centroamérica a quienes con frecuencia se les niega el crédito por avances artísticos y filosóficos que están arraigados en su oposición de largo plazo a diferentes formas de opresión. Algunos ejemplos anteriores serían la desmaterialización de las artes visuales, o estéticas relacionales. En el caso de las estéticas relacionales, Bourriaud [15] afirmaba haber introducido este concepto en París, aunque artistas como Lygia Clark ya habían trabajado de manera mucho más intensa para establecer espacios relacionales de subjetividad más de veinte años atrás en Brasil.[16] Con respecto a la desmaterialización de las artes, en Argentina, Oscar Masotta [17] escribió sobre ello en el mismo año que Lucy Lippard, pero la última fue declarada como la creadora del término.[18] Pueden encontrarse más detalles sobre esta pregunta en mi artículo en la edición actual de FIELD acerca del imperialismo epistemológico, con base en pensadores como Silvia Rivera Cusicanqui y Boaventura de Sousa Santos.

En este contexto, y en relación con el catálogo de Talking to Action, debe enfatizarse la importancia del libro coeditado por Kelley y Kester.[19] Este reúne textos escritos por muchos de los artistas y pensadores latinoamericanos principales y traducidos al inglés, haciéndolos accesibles para un público no hispanohablante. Como reconocimiento a esta historia de apropiación cultural, artística y filosófica, el Ciclo de Reflexión abrió intencionalmente un espacio para que los artistas e investigadores discutían sus prácticas, y creó una oportunidad para que la comunidad de la SAIC aprenda de su ejemplo. En palabras de Kelley: “. . . lo único que tenía sentido era partir de la idea que tratamos de aprender algo y que este aprendizaje debería adoptar la forma de un diálogo.”[20] De aquí la forma de diálogo del Ciclo de Reflexión, y su título, Learning Art and Resistance from the South (Aprender Arte y Resistencia del Sur).

“Arte y Resistencia” le da la esperada justicia a la extrema riqueza de las prácticas artísticas latinoamericanas que han tomado la forma de resistencia en contra de la opresión social, económica y política. Recientemente también, han surgido muchas prácticas creativas que se oponen con éxito al saqueo y la explotación ambiental. Muchos artistas, activistas del arte y grupos, han desarrollado y llevado a cabo obras de arte extremadamente sofisticadas —e intervenciones artísticas—basadas en un pensamiento crítico riguroso, orientado por principios de colectividad, derivando en una alta eficacia simbólica. De este modo, han podido oponerse con éxito a la opresión política y a discursos hegemónicos (en el sentido descrito por Mouffe anteriormente). En resumen, el objetivo del Ciclo de Reflexión era crear un espacio para el diálogo, el intercambio, y la co-construcción de significados. Ofreció una plataforma para el pensamiento y la lectura críticos relacionados con las artes contemporáneas y la filosofía latinoamericana como formas de resistencia, una crítica al imperialismo epistemológico y a la subjetivaciones capitalista así como un intercambio de arte y experiencias políticas entre Norte y Suramérica, y los mundos angloparlante e hispanohablante. Por último, el Ciclo de Reflexión aumentó la inclusión del idioma y la cultura hispana en la Escuela y en la ciudad de Chicago, haciendo uso de prácticas artísticas hispanas como modelos de aprendizaje.

Los Eventos del Ciclo de Reflexión

Learning Art and Resistance from the South fue diseñado para estudiantes, docentes y personal de la SAIC, así como para otras partes interesadas en Chicago. Los eventos, incluyendo el almuerzo, estuvieron abiertos al público sin ningún costo. Cada sesión consistía en un diálogo entre un artista o académico radicado en Chicago y artistas (o colectivos de artistas) de la exhibición, comunicándose por Skype. Después de la discusión entre los artistas, la conversación era abierta al público para preguntas y comentarios. Al principio de cada sesión, se distribuía una lista de referencia, sugiriendo literatura y recursos digitales relevantes en español e inglés, incluyendo recomendaciones de los protagonistas del diálogo.

Los participantes radicados en Chicago fueron elegidos por mí (Eva Marxen), y a su vez ellos eligieron a los artistas específicos de la exhibición con quienes sostenían el diálogo. Yo conocía el trabajo de Brian Holmes, ya que habíamos colaborado simultáneamente con el museo Macba en Barcelona desde 2000 hasta 2013, durante un período de importante innovación institucional.[21] Conocí a Ionit Behar recorriendo la exhibición de Hélio Oiticica en el museo del Art Institute con mis estudiantes en 2017. Finalmente, Josh Ríos y yo concebimos y llevamos a cabo el viaje estudiantil de la SAIC  “Prácticas Artísticas Sociales y Contemporáneas en Chile” en 2018.

El primer evento tuvo lugar con Brian Holmes e Iconoclasistas, una pareja de artistas radicados en Buenos Aires, formada en 2006 por Pablo Ares y Julia Risler. Su trabajo consiste en el mapeo crítico colaborativo y estrategias de cartografía crítica. Ellos organizan dispositifs gráficos gratuitos para investigación colectiva, colaborativa y participativa. Sus materiales y metodologías también son difundidas de manera gratuita en internet, a través de licencias Creative Commons, tales como el Manual de Mapeo Colectivo: Recursos Cartográficos Críticos para Procesos Territoriales de Creación Colaborativa.[22] En los talleres con estos dos artistas, los participantes son motivados a tomar una vista aérea del territorio de conflicto a mapear. Apuntan a un cambio de percepción, una transformación simultánea del ser y del territorio, así como una retroalimentación bidireccional entre artistas y participantes. En lugar de crear una obra de arte y compartirla luego con el público, Iconoclasistas comparte un espacio y una metodología con el fin de desarrollar una obra conjuntamente con otros.

Su trabajo con frecuencia protesta contra el saqueo y la explotación del medio ambiente, lo que lleva a la degradación de comunidades enteras. Esto se manifiesta en las obras de arte exhibidas en la exhibición Talking to Action. Radiografía del Corazón del Agronegocio Sojero (2010) se opone a la expansión masiva de soya y pesticidas transgénicos, y Megaminería en los Andes Secos (2010), se enfoca en la destrucción del ecosistema andino, con consecuencias nocivas para los derechos y la salud de comunidades enteras. Para cumplir su propósito artístico, Iconoclasistas trabaja con el concepto de una “cosmovisión rebelde”. Cosmovisión—una visión crítica y mapeo del extractivismo y la explotación ambiental—son exactamente los puntos compartidos por Brian Holmes. Él es un activista, crítico cultural, teórico social y cartógrafo que vive en Chicago después de pasar un par de décadas en Francia. Brian es conocido por sus ensayos sobre arte, movimientos sociales y economía política. Un visitante frecuente de América Latina, ha escrito acerca de varios grupos artísticos argentinos, y actualmente está trabajando con Alejandro Meitin de Ala Plástica. Durante los últimos años, se ha desplazado al papel de artista, creando mapas en línea e instalaciones de museos acerca de ecología política.[23]

La segunda sesión se dio entre la historiadora de arte, curadora y escritora uruguaya radicada en Chicago, Ionit Behar y Dignicraft. Dignicraft es un colectivo artístico híbrido, compañía de producción de medios y mediador cultural, inspirado por la lucha por la dignidad humana y la justicia, el proceso artesanal de creación, y la potencial colaboración para provocar cambios. El grupo logra sus propósitos produciendo documentales, distribuyendo productos culturales (como películas), y promoviendo talleres colaborativos como parte de un proyecto de arte contemporáneo. Los asuntos más importantes para Dignicraft son la calidad de las relaciones que establecen en sus proyectos, y sus consecuencias. Describen su práctica como que gira en torno a “encuentros, donde es clave el diálogo, el respeto y la posibilidad de comunicarse a través de acciones o actividades prácticas.”[24] Dignicraft ha estado activo desde 2013, principalmente en Tijuana, México, y también transnacionalmente en California, EEUU. El grupo evolucionó del trabajo colectivo iniciado en el año 2000 bajo el nombre Bulbo, y Galatea audio/visual. Actualmente, Dignicraft incluye a Paola Rodríguez, José Luis Figueroa, Omar Foglio, Blanca O. España†, David Figueroa, and Araceli Blancarte. Ubicados en la frontera en Tijuana, Dignicraft opera entre el flujo transnacional y transcultural de personas, productos, noticias, drogas, arte, artesanías, etc. Como explicaron en la sesión, esta posición allí les ha llevado a un cambio permanente de perspectiva. En Talking to Action mostraron su proyecto colaborativo, La Piñata Colaborativa (2015-2017) que “se enfoca en la migración y la memoria. En talleres realizados con Dignicraft, los artistas purépechas mapearon su reubicación de Michoacán a Rosarito, Baja California, utilizaron su crónica migratoria para inspirar la producción de piñatas referidas a su experiencia migratoria y trabajaron para negociar una relación comercial más equitativa con vendedores en Los Ángeles.”[25] Los intereses de Ionit Behar se han enfocado en el arte latinoamericana y norteamericana del siglo veinte, arte bajo censura, práctica artística comprometida socialmente, la historia de las exhibiciones y teorías de espacio y lugar. Ella también es la directora de servicios curatoriales de Fieldwork Collaborative Projects NFP (FIELDWORK) en Chicago.

La segunda sesión incluyó un diálogo sobre la mediación de trabajo de Dignicraft e incluyó fragmentos de su película Tijuaneados Anónimos (2009), un proyecto que reunió personas de Tijuana semanalmente para discutir y reflexionar sobre su ciudad, durante un momento en que la vasta violencia había amenazado con fracturar el cuerpo social de la ciudad. Los participantes reflexionaron sobre la ciudad y sobre ellos mismos, y cómo cambiar ambos. El proyecto es una forma de resistencia contra la violencia, pero también contra esconderse uno mismo y la autocensura. Retirarse de la vida pública, retirarse al hogar, alimenta la ansiedad y el terror: “Allí alimenta las pesadillas, dañando la capacidad de protesta pública y la oposición vehemente inteligente.”[26] El objetivo de Tijuaneados Anónimos era revertir esta fragmentación. Los artistas y comunidades involucradas buscaron lo que Michael Taussig ha descrito como “un nuevo ritual público cuyo objetivo sea permitir al tremendo poder moral y mágico de los muertos inquietos fluir a la esfera pública, empoderar a las personas, y desafiar a los potenciales guardianes del estado nacional, guardianes de sus muertos, así como de sus vivos, de su significado y de su destino.”[27]

La tercera sesión fue un diálogo tripartito entre Josh Ríos (SAIC), Sandra de la Loza de Los Ángeles, y Eduardo Molinari de Buenos Aires. Sandra de la Loza crea plataformas abiertas basadas en investigación que orientan consultas que abarcan componentes visuales, experimentales, sociales y pedagógicos. En 2002, fundó la Pocho Research Society of Erased and Invisible History (Sociedad de Investigación Pocho de Historia Eliminada e Invisible), un proyecto colaborativo continuo que involucra el tema de “Historia” (con H mayúscula) por medio de indagación crítica y procesos artísticos. Ella explora la Historia como un espacio de práctica elástico, que puede ser moldeado, estirado y expandido, mientras expone los procesos mediante los cuales se crean narrativas dominantes. Eduardo Molinari es artista visual y profesor de investigación en el Departamento de Artes Visuales de la Universidad Nacional de las Artes (UNA), Buenos Aires. En el núcleo de su trabajo están caminar como una práctica estética, investigación con herramientas basadas en el arte, y colaboraciones multidisciplinarias. En 2001, creó el Archivo Caminante, un archivo visual en proceso que indaga la relación entre el arte y la historia, y desarrolla críticas de las narrativas históricas dominantes, acciones contra la momificación de la memoria social, y ejercicios en imaginación política colectiva.[28] Las contribuciones de Molinari y de la Loza a Talking to Action marcaron su primera colaboración. De acuerdo con las características comunes del trabajo de ambos—desarrollar “narrativas contra-hegemónicas”[29] mediante prácticas dialogísticas y archivísticas—, participaron en investigaciones transnacionales sobre la producción de espacio, economías extractivistas, desplazamiento, y saberes indígenas eclipsados y vivientes. Estos estudios resultaron en su instalación/archivo Donde se juntan los ríos: hidromancia archivista y otros fantasmas. Incluye diferentes elementos visuales, de archivo, de sonido y de texto, incluyendo un diálogo sostenido en la forma de “cartas caminantes”.

Josh Ríos es docente en la Escuela del Instituto de Artes de Chicago, donde enseña cursos en estudios críticos visuales y prácticas basadas en la investigación. Como artista audiovisual, escritor y educador, sus proyectos tratan sobre las historias, archivos y futuro de la subjetividad Latinx y las relaciones entre EEUU y México, según lo entendido a través de la globalización y el neocolonialismo. En su sesión con Sandra y Eduardo, discutieron preguntas de historia y memoria, y cómo crear historia hoy en día trayéndola a las artes. También profundizaron sobre su colaboración transnacional sobre cartografía crítica. De acuerdo con los artistas, la meta de su colaboración no era llegar a conclusiones, sino generar preguntas acerca de preocupaciones comunes en sus respectivos proyectos de investigación. Esta indagación toma la forma de una investigación visual. Su colaboración también incluyó una crítica institucional de la educación oficial, relacionada con su deseo compartido de crear sus propios espacios contra-pedagógicos que deberían enseñar desobediencia e insubordinación, así como la imaginación política, necesaria para la resistencia. Finalmente, debatieron sobre el neo-extractivismo, así como el neocolonialismo y el antropocentrismo. La sabiduría indígena ha comprendido la importancia de un diálogo, y la coexistencia con la naturaleza y los no humanos por cientos de miles de años, pero la Historia dominante ha tratado de borrar esta sabiduría. Aquí, existen paralelos obvios con la primera sesión con Holmes e Iconoclasistas en su investigación sobre cosmovisión, ecotopía, y formas artísticas de resistencia contra la opresión ambiental.

La Visión

Una motivación importante para el número especial de FIELD fue convertir las conversaciones del Ciclo de Reflexión de Hablar y Actuar en una publicación. Aun así, deseo hacer énfasis en que ninguna de las contribuciones publicadas aquí son simples transcripciones de las grabaciones, sino más bien nuevas elaboraciones de forma escrita. Los artículos proporcionan espacio para reflexionar sobre la colaboración, con textos que han sido escritos como respuesta a alianzas artísticas sobre temas tales como memoria consagrada, contra-narrativas y nuevos imaginativos políticos por medio del para-archivismo (Ríos, Molinari y de la Loza). Alternativamente, Iconoclasistas desarrollan dispositivos para pensar lo común en forma de un mapeo crítico colectivo que se opone a la hegemonía. Behar y Dignicraft reflexionan sobre encuentros y colaboraciones como parte de una práctica artística que está basada en la participación, el diálogo y el aprendizaje mutuo. Los relatos escritos de las tres sesiones del Ciclo de Reflexión son precedidas por artículos sobre procesos curatoriales (Caso & Barco), incluyendo desafíos para definir y construir “comunidad” en y a través de la curaduría (Kelley). Varas y Gutiérrez, quienes colaboraron como investigadores en la exhibición Talking to Action desde su comienzo, reflexionan aquí sobre la investigación, el cuidado y la resistencia en el contexto de la violencia (neo) colonial. Marxen profundiza sobre el imperialismo epistemológico del Atlántico Norte con relación al arte. Más allá del Ciclo y de la exhibición, la Red Conceptualismos del Sur (RedCSur) requiere una política de archivo común para las artes y la política en condición contemporánea de gobiernos reaccionarios, negación histórica y restricciones severas a los derechos públicos y humanos. Durante la preparación de esta edición de FIELD, ha habido brotes importantes de resistencia pública en Suramérica, donde las personas han protestado activamente y de manera creativa en contra de las políticas neoliberales, de derecha y represivas. Tres contribuciones hacen justicia a la resistencia continua, permanente y rigurosa que ocurre en Chile: Paulina Varas relaciona las subjetividades y el arte con un nuevo devenir político. Guillermo Rivera y Luis Jiménez reflexionan sobre la juventud y su resistencia contra el desempleo, la precarización y el neoliberalismo. Y Mirliana Ramírez profundiza nuestro  conocimiento sobre la ciudadanía y la participación política en la academia, así como el rol del académico en la sociedad.

El aprendizaje y la colaboración son hilos conductores a lo largo de la edición. Han sido evidentes en el proceso de curaduría y la investigación relacionada, las prácticas artísticas bajo discusión, y el proceso de redacción de esta edición. “Debe existir un respeto por el proceso de colaboración y diálogo como la forma de arte. Es decir, para parafrasear a Freire, estos objetos no son la conclusión de la praxis dialógica; a veces, simplemente son mediadores de los diálogos en curso.”[30] En este sentido, deseamos contribuir a una discusión continua que se opone a “nociones convencionales de autonomía estética”, y en su lugar, continuar expandiendo la epistemología de prácticas colaborativas. El proceso de colaboración también conlleva “implicaciones hermenéuticas”, ya que es esencial para la comprensión de las creaciones artísticas en sí mismas.[31] Participar en este proceso abierto de indagación e imaginación, en imágenes y/o palabras, debería considerarse como una forma de resistencia contra la subjetivación del neoliberalismo y su ilusión de entregar respuestas rápidas y fáciles.[32]

Agradecimientos

Agradezco a todos los artistas, colectivos, escritores y traductores participantes de Learning Art and Resistance from the South. Gracias a todos sus textos, imágenes, traducciones y conversaciones (en línea) el proceso de edición ha sido increíblemente gratificante y enriquecedor. Espero que este número continúa abriendo espacios para futuros debates con todos.

Particularmente, me gustaría agradecer al curador Bill Kelley Jr. quien ha apoyado esta publicación desde sus inicios.

Al mismo tiempo, mi gratitud va a las Galerías Sullivan de SAIC, precisamente a Trevor Martin y Hannah Barco por su apoyo tanto en la organización del ciclo de reflexión epónimo como en esta publicación.

De la misma manera, agradezco a Grant Kester y al colectivo editorial de FIELD su gran apoyo, aliento y flexibilidad durante la edición de este número.

Referencias

[1] “Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas,” School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), consultado 12.2.2020, https://sites.saic.edu/talkingtoaction/.

[2] Los artistas presentados en la exhibición de SAIC, Hablar y Actuar: Arte, Pedagogía y Activismo en las Américas, fueron:

  • Ultra-red y la Escuela de Echoes Los Ángeles (Los Ángeles, EEUU)
  • BijaRi (São Paulo, Brasil)
  • Colectivo Cog•nate (Tijuana, México/Los Ángeles, EEUU)
  • Grupo Contrafilé (São Paulo, Brasil)
  • Liliana Angulo Cortés (Bogotá, Colombia)
  • Dignicraft (Tijuana, México/Los Ángeles, EEUU)
  • Andrés Padilla Domene + Iván Puig Domene (Guadalajara/San Miguel de Allende, México)
  • Etcétera… (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  • Frente 3 de Fevereiro (São Paulo, Brasil)
  • Colectivo FUGA (Otavalo, Ecuador)
  • Clara Ianni (São Paulo, Brasil)
  • Iconoclasistas (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  • Suzanne Lacy (Los Ángeles, EEUU)
  • Alfadir Luna (Ciudad de México, México)
  • Sandra de la Loza (Los Ángeles, EEUU) y Eduardo Molinari (Buenos Aires, Argentina)
  • Taniel Morales (Ciudad de México, México)
  • POLEN (Tijuana, México/San Diego, EEUU)
  • Gala Porras-Kim (Los Ángeles, EEUU)
  • KRT (Kolectivo de Restauración Territorial, territorio Mapuche, sur de Chile).
  • Docente de SAIC María Gaspar y el Radioactive Ensemble
  • Pedro Reyes (Ciudad de México) y sus creaciones artísticas relacionadas con el espacio de SAIC en North Lawndale

Para más información de los artistas, visite https://sites.saic.edu/talkingtoaction/artists/, consultado 20.2.2020, y el catálogo editado por Kelley y Zamora, 2017.

[3] “Affiliated Exhibition: Beatriz Santiago Muñoz: Safehouse,” School of the Art Institute of Chicago, consultado 20.2.2020, https://sites.saic.edu/talkingtoaction/affiliated-exhibition.

[4] Linda Basch, Nina Glick Schiller y Cristina Szanton Blanc, Nations Unbound: Transnational Projects, Postcolonial Predicaments, and Deterritorialized Nation-States (Nueva York: Gordon and Breach, 1994), p.7.

[5] Arjun Appadurai, Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimension of Globalization (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1996); George Marcus, Ethnography Through Thick and Thin (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998); Eva Marxen, “‘La comunidad silenciosa’. Migraciones Filipinas y capital social en el Raval (Barcelona),” Ph.D. tesis, Universidad Rovira i Virgili, 2012. http://www.tdx.cat/bitstream/handle/10803/96667/ TESIS.pdf?sequence=1.

[6] Bill Kelley Jr., “Agradecimientos,” en Hablar y Actuar: Arte, Pedagogía y Activismo en las Américas, editado por Bill Kelley Jr. con Rebecca Zamora (Los Ángeles: Otis College y Chicago: School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2017), pp.v-vi.; Karen Moss, “Hablar y Actuar: Un preámbulo al proyecto y sus plataformas,” en Hablar y Actuar: Arte, Pedagogía y Activismo en las Américas, ed. Bill Kelley Jr. con Rebecca Zamora (Los Ángeles: Otis College y Chicago: School of the Art Institute of Chicago, 2017), pp.1-7.

[7] Chantal Mouffe, Prácticas artísticas y democracia agonística, traducido por Jordi Palou y Carlos Manzano (Barcelona: MACBA y Bellaterra: UAB, 2007); Chantal Mouffe, “Alfredo Jaar: The Artist as Organic Intellectual,” en Alfredo Jaar. The Way it is. An Aesthetics of Resistance, editado por RealismusStudio (Berlín: RealismusStudio of NGBK, New Society for Visual Arts, 2012), pp.263-281.

[8] Eva Marxen, “Deshaciendo fronteras: el arte como denuncia,” en No nos cabe tanta muerte, catálogo de exposición, editado por Paula Laverde (Barcelona/Granollers: Roca Umbert, 2013); Eva Marxen, “La expresión veraz de los saberes corporeizados,” en Más allá del texto. Cultura digital y nuevas epistemologías, editado por Ileana A. Hernández, Luisa F. Grijalva Maza y Alfonso A. R. Gómez Rossi (México: Editorial Itaca, 2016), pp.67-78; Eva Marxen, “Art Therapy,” en Critical Perspectives in Arts Therapies: Response/Ability across a Continuum of Practice, co-escrito por Nisha Sajnani, Eva Marxen y Rebecca Zarate, The Arts in Psychotherapy 54, pp.28–37. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2017.01.007.; Eva Marxen, “Artistic Practices and the Artistic Dispositif. A Critical Review,” Antípoda. Journal of Anthropology and Archeology 33 (2018), pp.37-60.

[9] Chantal Mouffe, Prácticas artísticas y democracia agonística; Mouffe, Alfredo Jaar, pp.263-281.

[10] Ana Longoni, “Experimentos en las inmediaciones del arte y la política,” en Roberto Jacoby. El deseo nace del derrumbe. Acciones, conceptos, escritos, editado por Roberto Jacoby (Barcelona: La Central, 2011), pp.5-29.

[11] Eva Marxen, Deshaciendo fronteras; Marxen, La expresión veraz de los saberes corporeizados, pp.67-78; Marxen, Artistic practices and the artistic dispositif, pp. 37-60.

[12] Bill Kelley Jr. con Rebecca Zamora, Hablar y Actuar.

[13] Bill Kelley Jr., Agradecimientos, Hablar y Actuar, p.v.

[14] Bill Kelley Jr., “Hablando y actuando: Un experimento de curaduría orientado al diálogo y al aprendizaje,” pp.9-10.

[15] Nicolas Bourriaud, Esthétique relationnelle (Dijon: Les presses du réel, 1998).

[16] Lygia Clark, editado por Manuel Borja y Nuria Enguita (Barcelona: Fundació Antoni Tàpies, 1998), catálogo de exposición; Lygia Clark. The Abandonment of Art, 1948-1988, editado por Cornelia Butler y Luis Pérez-Oramas (Nueva York: The Museum of Modern Art), catálogo de exposición; Eva Marxen, “Therapeutic Thinking in Contemporary Art. Psychotherapy in the Arts,” The Arts in Psychotherapy 36, pp.131-139. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aip.2008.10.004.; Suely Rolnik, Lygia Clark. De l’œuvre à l’événement – Nous sommes le moule. A vous de donner le soufflé (Nantes: Musée des Beaux-Arts de Nantes, 2005), catálogo de exposición.

[17] Ana Longoni y Mariano Mestman, “After Pop, We Dematerialize: Oscar Masotta, Happenings, and Media Art at the Beginnings of Conceptualism,” en Listen Here Now! Argentine Art of the 1960s: Writings of the Avant-Garde, editado por Ines Katzenstein (Nueva York: The Museum of Modern Art, 2004), pp.156-172; Oscar Masotta, “Después del pop: nosotros desmaterializamos,” en Conciencia y estructura, editado por Oscar Masotta (Buenos Aires: Editorial Jorge Álvarez, 1968), pp.218-245.

[18] Lucy Lippard y John Chandler, “The Dematerialization of Art,” Art International 12, no. 2 (1968), pp.31-36.

[19] Bill Kelley Jr. y Grant Kester, Collective Situations. Readings in Contemporary Latin American Art, 1995-2010 (Durham y Londres: Duke University Press, 2017).

[20] Bill Kelley Jr., “Hablando y actuando: Un experimento de curaduría orientado al diálogo y al aprendizaje,” p.10.

[21] Eva Marxen, La comunidad silenciosa; Marxen, La expresión veraz de los saberes corporeizados, 67-78; Marxen, Artistic Practices and the Artistic Dispositif, pp.37-60; Jorge Ribalta, “Experimentos para una nueva institucionalidad,” en Objetos relacionales, Colección Macba 2002-2007, editado por Manuel Borja, Kaira Cabañas y Jorge Ribalta (Barcelona: MACBA, 2010), p. 225-265.

[22] Iconoclasistas, Manual de Mapeo Colectivo: Recursos Cartográficos Críticos para Procesos Territoriales de Creación Colaborativa (Buenos Aires: Iconoclasistas, 2013). https://www.iconoclasistas.net/manual-de-mapeo-colectivo/ (consultado 20.2.2020).

[23] Para sus últimas investigaciones véase: www.ecotopia.today (consultado 20.2.2020).

[24] Bill Kelley Jr. con Rebecca Zamora, Hablar y Actuar, p.115.

[25] Karen Moss, Hablar y Actuar: Un preámbulo al proyecto y sus plataformas, p.3.

[26] Michael Taussig, “Violence and Resistance in the Americas: The Legacy of Conquest,” en The Nervous System, editado por Michael Taussig (Londres y Nueva York: Routledge, 1992), p.48.

[27] Taussig, Violence and Resistance in the Americas, pp.48-49.

[28] Nuria Enguita y Eduardo Molinari, “A Conversation between Eduardo Molinari and Nuria Enguita Mayo,” Afterall 30 (Verano 2012), pp. 61-75.

[29] Jennifer Ponce de León, “La batalla del presente: Pocho Research Society, Archivo Caminante y Etcétera,” en Hablar y Actuar: Arte, Pedagogía y Activismo en las Américas, editado por Bill Kelley Jr., p. 56.

[30] Bill Kelley Jr., “Hablando y actuando: Un experimento de curaduría orientado al diálogo y al aprendizaje,” p.15.

[31] Grant Kester, The One and the Many. Contemporary Collaborative Art in a Global Context (Durham y Londres: Duke University Press, 2011), pp.9-10.

[32] Eva Marxen, Art Therapy, pp.28-36.